In my last post, I argued that we reap in public what we sow in private. In other words, our private practices and pursuits have implications on our public life. This is especially true in our relationship with Jesus. If we never spend time cultivating the relationship in private, there will be no speaking of him in public because there will be no well to draw from. If we do not engage in private prayer, we will certainly not enjoy public prayer. If the Word of God is not enjoyed in private, it is doubtful that we will exult in the Word as it is preached.

To that end, private worship affects public worship. What we do in private fuels what we do in public. But the reverse is also true. Public worship affects private worship.

PSALM 40
In the last post, we considered how private worship affects public worship from Psalm 40 (You can refresh here).  This time, let’s look at a few implications that Psalm 40 has on how public worship affects private worship.

  • The Psalm is written down for us. We are reading of David’s experience with the Lord and are supposed to be encouraged by it. David wrote that we might find hope in the God who inclined his ear to him, heard his cry, drew him out of a pit, put his feet on a rock, and gave him a new song (Ps 40:1-2). David’s public worship is supposed to encourage your private worship even as you quietly read the Psalm.

  • The “new song” of praise to God leads others to put their trust in the Lord (Ps 40:3). The new song, sung for all to hear, leads others to faith. What greater earthly benefit can there be to our worship than the salvation of souls!

  • The wondrous deeds and thoughts of the Lord have been multiplied towards us in Christ. This leads to public proclamation (Ps 40:5) that others may benefit from knowing the work of God. The reason you tell someone about a glory you have seen is for their delight to increase. Telling the wondrous deeds of the Lord fuels worship when we are no longer gathered together.

PUBLIC WORSHIP HELPS FUEL BELIEF
Our souls need fuel for worship. The reason is that we don't naturally wake up with hearts oriented toward the glory of God. Instead, we wake up with hearts oriented toward ourselves. We know what we want. We think we know what we need. We spend most of our days toiling after both. But, when we come to the Bible, we cannot read much of the New Testament without bumping into the “one another” phrases. We’re called to love, exhort, forgive, sing over, bear with, serve, and encourage one another.

Public worship is one of the ways that we live out the “one another’s” of the Christian life. To be sure, God is worthy of all of our worship and our worship is for him. But, if I purchase flowers for my wife, who benefits? Well, she does, for sure, but so does everyone who enters the house. We all smell the aroma and we all get to enjoy the beauty. Worship is for God, but we all benefit from the aroma.

Our faith is personal, but it was never meant to be private. O, how we need to remember this when we gather together. Why? Because your engagement in corporate worship was never meant to only be an expression of your personal delight in God; your worship is also designed to help the church (and non-christians) believe the gospel. Your worship has horizontal implications. By way of encouragement, engage in worship when we gather together. Sing with all your might. Lift your hands. Bow your knees. Worship - because God is worthy, and because your public worship fuels and affects not only your private worship, but the private worship of all who gather with you.