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Gospel of Mark

Their own king will soon be here (J.C. Ryle)

“The second coming of Christ shall be utterly unlike the first. He came the first time in weakness, a tender infant, born of a poor woman in the manger at Bethlehem, unnoticed, unhonored, and scarcely known. He shall come the second time in royal dignity, with the armies of heaven around him, to be known, recognized, and feared, by all the tribes of the earth. He came the first time to suffer - to bear our sins, to be reckoned a curse, to be despised, rejected, unjustly condemned, and slain. He shall come the second time to reign - to put down every enemy beneath his feet, to take the kingdoms of this world for his inheritance, to rule them with righteousness, to judge all men, and to live for evermore. How vast the difference! How mighty the contrast! How startling the comparison between the second advent and the first! How solemn the thoughts that the subject ought to stir up in our minds! Here are comfortable thoughts for Christ’s friends. Their own king will soon be here."

J.C. Ryle, Expository Thoughts on Mark, p. 226. Ryle is commenting on Mark 13:24-31. 

We shall thank God for every storm (J.C. Ryle)

“If we are true Christians, we must not expect everything smooth in our journey to heaven. We must count it no strange thing, if we have to endure sickness, losses, bereavements, and disappointments, just like other men. Free pardon and full forgiveness, grace by the way and glory at the end - all this our Savior has promised to give. But he has never promised that we shall have no afflictions. He loves us too well to promise that. By affliction he teaches us many precious lessons, which without it we should never learn. By affliction he shows us our emptiness and weakness, draws us to the throne of grace, purifies our affections, weans us from the world, makes us long for heaven. In the resurrection morning we shall all say, ‘it is good for me that I was afflicted.’ We shall thank God for every storm."

J.C. Ryle, Expository Thoughts on Mark, p. 66. Ryle is commenting on Mark 4:35-41.

Repentance and Faith (J.C. Ryle)

“Let us ask ourselves what we know of this repentance and faith. Have we felt our sins, and forsaken them? Have we laid hold on Christ, and believed? We may reach heaven without learning, or riches, or health, or worldly greatness. But we shall never reach heaven, if we die impenitent and unbelieving. A new heart, and a lively faith in a Redeemer are absolutely needful to salvation. May we never rest till we know them by experience, and can call them our own! With them all true Christianity begins in the soul."

J.C. Ryle, Expository Thoughts on Mark, p. 6. Ryle is commenting on Mark 1:9-20.